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Mar 162017
 

The 700 custom-designed bicycles will be placed at an estimated 70 stations designated at locations in neighborhoods around the city. (Flickr/Britt Reints).

If you want to help the city plan where bicycle share stations will be located in your neighborhood, there’s a public workshop for you.

There are six workshops – one for each general area of the city – that run through April. Mid-City and Bayou St. John split a workshop, which will be held April 3 at First Grace United Methodist Church, 3401 Canal St. The workshop starts at 6:30 p.m. Continue reading »

Mar 102017
 

A rider checks out a bicycle from a station in an image from a promotional video produced by Social Bicycles (via YouTube)

By Claire Byun
cbyun@nolamessenger.com

Neighborhood activists who are concerned about the future of the city’s new bicycle share program are working to ensure their voices are heard.

The city’s new bicycle share program has drawn some ire from Faubourg St. John residents who are concerned about program officials putting bike stations in residential neighborhoods. Several worried neighbors are putting together a committee – through the Faubourg St. John Neighborhood Association – to research the best station locations that don’t directly impact quiet areas. Continue reading »

Feb 022017
 

City Councilmember Jared Brossett is backing amendments to current ordinances regarding bicycle safety, operation and equipment requirements (Flickr/Britt Reints).

By Claire Byun
cbyun@nolamessenger.com

Rules and regulations around bicycle safety and operation may change a little in the near future, pending confirmation by the New Orleans City Council.

City Councilmember Jared Brossett is backing amendments to current ordinances regarding bicycle safety, operation and equipment requirements. Brossett brought those amendments to the council’s Jan. 12 meeting but were pushed to their Feb. 23 meeting. Continue reading »

Jul 282016
 
A vision for Tulane Avenue based on a 2011 report for the Regional Planning Commission (RPC).

A vision for Tulane Avenue based on a 2011 report for the Regional Planning Commission (RPC).

When officials with the Regional Planning Commission first announced a $10 million beautification project to a stretch of Tulane Avenue in Mid-City, they described a plan that would “significantly improve visual quality” along the corridor, as well as enhance pedestrian and bicycle mobility and safety.

Five years and nearly $5 million later, officials still tout final plans for a safer, wider street reduced from six lanes to four, thanks to improvements that will extend from South Carrollton to South Claiborne avenues.

What didn’t make the cut, however, are features that could have helped “reinvent” Tulane Avenue, as neighbors had hoped. small tulane

The city decided to widen the corridor along Tulane Avenue in the Mid-City and Tulane Gravier neighborhoods in 1957 because a medical services center was rapidly expanding there, according to report prepared for the Regional Planning Commission. Continue reading »

Jul 072016
 
Mayor Mitch Landrieu takes an inaugural ride on the Lafitte Greenway in November 2015. (MidCityMessenger.com file photo by Robert Morris)

Mayor Mitch Landrieu takes an inaugural ride on the Lafitte Greenway in November 2015. (MidCityMessenger.com file photo by Robert Morris)

By Claire Byum for MidCityMessenger.com

New Orleans is better off now than six years ago, though there’s still a long way to go before every need is met and every pothole filled, Mayor Mitch Landrieu told a Lakeview crowd Wednesday night. Continue reading »

Jun 132016
 
Virginia Brisley, left, and Tyrone Smith, right, escort a cyclist on the Lafitte greenway as he crosses north broad street. Brisley and Smith were part of the "Safe-Tea on the Greenway" event on Friday which promoted cyclist, pedestrian and auto safety at the major cross streets along the Lafitte greenway. (Zach Brien, MidCityMessenger.com)

Virginia Brisley, left, and Tyrone Smith, right, escort a cyclist on the Lafitte greenway as he crosses North Broad Street. Brisley and Smith were part of the “Safe-Tea on the Greenway” event on Friday which promoted cyclist, pedestrian and auto safety at the major cross streets along the Lafitte greenway. (Zach Brien, MidCityMessenger.com)

Yielding hand-made signs, concerned citizens, cyclists and politicians gathered on Friday, June 10, where the Lafitte Greenway meets North Broad Street to warn drivers of the crosswalk.

This was part of a Safe-Tea event, put on by the Claiborne Corridor Ambassadors, which aims to promote safety on the Lafitte Greenway for cyclists, pedestrians and cars. The greenway stretches from Mid-City through Treme and finishes on Claiborne Avenue. It crosses N. Jefferson Davis Parkway, N. Broad Street and Claiborne Avenue, streets with heavy flows of traffic.

Continue reading »