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Mar 202017
 

Photo by Bart Everson

We colored eggs for the vernal equinox, which this year falls on the 20th of March. I’d never heard of this method of coloring the hardboiled “whites” themselves, but my daughter found a video on YouTube that showed us how. For more on the meaning of this seasonal moment, check out this excerpt from my book. Happy equinox!

Bart Everson is a writer, a photographer, a baker of bread, a husband, a father and a resident of Mid-City. He is a founding member of the Green Party of Louisiana, past president of Friends of Lafitte Greenway, and a participant in New Orleans Lamplight Circle. More at BartEverson.com.

Mar 152017
 

Patrick Armstrong

On March 3, 1859, the largest slave auction in American history took place in Savannah, Georgia. The event was called “The Weeping Time” partly due to the rainy weather that attendees of the sale would later remark upon in their journals and letters, and partly due to the wailing of human families and communities torn apart by the atrocity of human chattel slavery. The event was big news at the time, even reporters from New York arrived to cover the story. But in years that followed, the story of the Weeping Time was muted by historical revision and omission in the effort to burnish the Lost Cause as something more noble than a conflict over keeping humans in bondage. While Savannah sells itself to tourists as a destination steeped in history and tradition, it did not have a historical marker to note this very real historical atrocity until 2008. Continue reading »

Mar 132017
 

bart-everson-headshot-2013

One day in September of 1995, I made a trip with my wife and a mutual friend to Cedar Bluff, a place I considered the most beautiful place in Indiana, and only fifteen minutes from our home in Bloomington. I experienced an intense re-awakening of some ideas and aspirations that had been slumbering close to my heart. Below, you can read what I wrote in my journal on that day. What’s fascinating to me is how much things have changed over the past two decades — and also how little. The very word “localism” (as an ideology, opposed to “globalism”) seemed like a novelty then.


September, 1995

The bureaucratic state and the multi-national conglomerates have made the individual irrelevant by breaking down the local community. They’ve made the local community irrelevant by isolating individuals in gilded cages.

What can be done? Big business and big government are so entrenched, so monolithic that revolutionary dreams seem like hopeless (and therefore pathetic) fantasies.

The only solution is to do to them what they’ve done to us. We must make big business and big government irrelevant to our lives as individuals and as a community. We need to develop communities that are more self-sufficient, independent, autonomous.

Continue reading »

Mar 062017
 

Photo by Bart Everson

I hear this window got broken by beads after I took this photo — second year running. I sure wish broken windows were the worst news to come out of Endymion this year, but instead we had a truck plowing into the crowd just three blocks away from this scene. I had no clue what happened at the time; in fact I was contacted by concerned friends from around the world before I even learned of the incident. Bad news travels faster than ever.

Bart Everson is a writer, a photographer, a baker of bread, a husband, a father and a resident of Mid-City. He is a founding member of the Green Party of Louisiana, past president of Friends of Lafitte Greenway, and a participant in New Orleans Lamplight Circle. More at BartEverson.com.

Feb 272017
 

Carnival revelers in the streets of New Orleans, 2012.

bart-everson-headshot-2013

When I moved to New Orleans at the tail-end of the 20th century, I had no idea what I was getting myself into. Despite a couple brief visits in my youth, the city was a virtual blind spot for me. I was sadly ignorant of even the most iconic aesthetics of New Orleans culture. The filigreed ironwork in the Quarter, the second-line parasol, oysters on the half shell — these were all revelations to me.

But the biggest revelation was surely Carnival. I wonder if native New Orleanians can ever truly appreciate the shock of this discovery. To encounter a new holiday at age 33 is bracing, to say the least.

And not just a new holiday — a whole new holiday season. What fun.

Continue reading »

Feb 232017
 

Patrick Armstrong

There’s an old political science phrase called the “tragedy of the commons.” This is a dynamic that states any public resource that can be used by everyone will be overused until it is exhausted and no longer has value. Way back in college, a professor described it in terms of cows. There was a field of grass owned by the townspeople and anyone could graze their cows there until their cows became too fat and ate all the grass. Or something. It was always a difficult concept for me to grasp when put in a bovine context, because what town has a bunch of people who own individual cows? Continue reading »

Feb 202017
 
Skyline

Photo by Bart Everson

Tearing down vacant warehouses to make way for apartments alongside the Lafitte Greenway.

Bart Everson is a writer, a photographer, a baker of bread, a husband, a father and a resident of Mid-City. He is a founding member of the Green Party of Louisiana, past president of Friends of Lafitte Greenway, and a participant in New Orleans Lamplight Circle. More at BartEverson.com.

Feb 132017
 
Photo: at the Women's March

My wife and a friend at the Women’s March in New Orleans. Thanks to the random stranger who took this photo, whoever you are.

bart-everson-headshot-2013

History will record that Donald Trump’s presidency was greeted with massive protests worldwide. That is, of course, if any historians survive and are allowed to write anything approaching the truth. Here in New Orleans, the Women’s March on the day after the inauguration drew somewhere close to 15,000, surely the largest demonstration in our city, ever.

This is a good thing. We need more protest in this country. Protest should be a widespread part of our general culture. Unless, of course, everything is OK. (It’s not.)

To reach the epic levels we’ve seen over the last month, it stands to reason there must be plenty of fresh blood in the mix. Many people protesting have never done so before in their entire lives. I know at least one such person. I bet you do too. Maybe you even are that person.

This also is a good thing, a very good thing. It’s inspiring to me. Seeing so many people out at demonstrations, marches, protests and rallies, I get excited. Surely revolution is imminent! I got so worked up after this last round of protests, I almost felt optimistic about the future for a moment.
Continue reading »

Feb 072017
 

Patrick Armstrong

What does the bumper sticker slogan say? “New Orleans – 3rd World and Proud of It?” That sentiment may be fun on a snarky souvenir, but I lose the joke when it is made at the expense of so many individuals living in our city. What may be enjoyed by some tourist looking for an authentic weekend experience in a gritty New Orleans neighborhood takes on a very different meaning when we think about the living conditions of the neighbors who live there every day.

Too many of our New Orleans neighbors live in conditions that are not fit for human habitation. That’s why I’m glad to see New Orleans City Council working on the Healthy Homes ordinance. Most of you may know it as the Rental Registry. Continue reading »

Feb 062017
 
Banks Street Bike Lane

Photo by Bart Everson

I’ve been biking down Banks with my baby for years. We love the new stripes. Our only question: What took so long?

Bart Everson is a writer, a photographer, a baker of bread, a husband, a father and a resident of Mid-City. He is a founding member of the Green Party of Louisiana, past president of Friends of Lafitte Greenway, and a participant in New Orleans Lamplight Circle. More at BartEverson.com.