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Aug 092016
 
Debbie Lindsey and Philipe LaMancusa of Kitchen Witch

Debbie Lindsey and Philipe LaMancusa of Kitchen Witch

The Shopkeeper Stories series shares the vision and personality of New Orleans business owners. Locally owned businesses infuse New Orleans neighborhoods with their unique character, and are a big part of why we want to live, work, eat and shop here.

While drainage system improvements and road construction make “shopping local” a bit more challenging in the short term, the critical improvements mean our city will be safer and stronger for generations to come. We hope you are inspired and continue to shop small and shop local—even if it takes a little extra time!

Shopkeeper: Debbie Lindsey and Philipe LaMancusa
Shop: Kitchen Witch
Since 1999
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Aug 012016
 
Alex Edwards, far left, discussed how her group addressed a real-life scenario they were given, the struggle of a refugee in Syria. Students displayed their work from the fifth annual architecture and design summer camp put on by the National Organization of Minority Architects. (Zach Brien, MidCityMessenger.com)

Alex Edwards, far left, discussed how her group addressed a real-life scenario they were given, the struggle of a refugee in Syria. Students displayed their work from the fifth annual architecture and design summer camp put on by the National Organization of Minority Architects. (Zach Brien, MidCityMessenger.com)

On Saturday afternoon, students from from the fifth annual Architecture and Design Justice Summer Camp hosted by the National Organization of Minority Architects’ Louisiana chapter gathered at the Joan Mitchell Center to display their work from the camp. The camp consisted of New Orleans-area high school students mentored by college students or professionals. Continue reading »

Jul 162016
 
The Lost Bayou Ramblers play in the lobby of NOMA as part of the 2016 Bastille Fete. The annual event celebrates the French holiday, Bastille Day. (Zach Brien, MidCityMessenger.com)

The Lost Bayou Ramblers play in the lobby of NOMA as part of the 2016 Bastille Fete. The annual event celebrates the French holiday, Bastille Day. (Zach Brien, MidCityMessenger.com)

On Friday afternoon, NOMA celebrated their annual event, Bastille Fete. The event is a celebration of French culture in honor of Bastille Day, the French holiday which takes place on July 14. This year’s event took on a more somber tone after roughly 80 people were killed in Nice, France when a truck plowed into a group of people celebrating Bastille Day. Gregor Trumel, Consul General of France in Louisiana, spoke at the event. In his speech on the steps of the museum he encouraged people to celebrate despite the tragedy, to not let the act of violence stop them.

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Jul 132016
 

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First opening in 1898, the two-mile miniature train in the Carousel Gardens Amusement Park is one of City Park’s most popular attractions. The track circles the park’s oldest terrain, winding along City Park Ave., where you can see some of the oldest Live Oak trees, including the McDonogh Oak! This oak tree is estimated to be over 600 years old. It is named for philanthropist John McDonogh who acquired Allard Plantation at a sheriff’s sale in 1845. Like any magical place in the park, you may be surprised by what you see on your ride! Continue reading »

Jun 082016
 

FOCP_colorLogo2013_rgbSummer is just beginning, and City Park is already alive with plenty of activity throughout its 1,300-acre grounds. There is no way to grow bored this summer while endless possibilities are waiting in the Park.

Have you ever hiked to the highest point in New Orleans? Climb the hill called Laborde Mountain in Couturie Forest one afternoon. Want to put your seasonal cooking skills to use? Grab some friends and pack a delicious spread to have a picnic on the Goldring/Woldenberg Great Lawn. Interested in lending a helping hand? Sign up as a volunteer for a Super Saturday to do projects such as painting and planting. Read on for more fantastic and FREE things to do in YOUR City Park. Continue reading »

Jun 072016
 
A density gnome in its natural habitat. Despite super-high-density development, Hong Kong still struggles with a housing shortage, affordability issues, and paying for public services (photo provided by Patrick Armstrong).

A density gnome in its natural habitat. Despite super-high-density development, Hong Kong still struggles with a housing shortage, affordability issues, and paying for public services (photo provided by Patrick Armstrong).

Have you ever sat through a presentation where someone is selling something, and there’s a big hole in their plan they fill with magical thinking? This dynamic has been called a lot of things, from snake-oil to outside-the-box-thinking to conventional wisdom, but most of it boils down to a salesman skipping over an important part of the details and hoping you don’t notice. Nowhere was this more brilliantly described than in South Park’s examination of “underpants gnomes.” These imaginary creatures sneak into your room in the dark of night with a seemingly simple but effective business plan:Face

Phase 1: Steal underpants.
Phase 2: ???
Phase 3: Profit!

Once you see the problem with plans like this, it is hard to unsee it.

If you pay any attention to land use in New Orleans, you may have come across a similarly simple business plan regarding how many residences should be allowed in your neighborhood. The answer is almost always more than is allowed by zoning law, which is far more than what the neighbors usually want to see. But laws and public opinion are almost irrelevant because to a certain type of magical thinking, Phase 1 of development is almost always the same: Increase Density. Continue reading »

May 222016
 
Anders Osborne solos on his guitar at the Orleans Avenue stage at Bayou Boogaloo 2016. The festival took place on May 20 to 22 on the banks of Bayou St. John. (Zach Brien, MidCityMessenger.com)

Anders Osborne solos on his guitar at the Orleans Avenue stage at Bayou Boogaloo 2016. The festival took place on May 20 to 22 on the banks of Bayou St. John. (Zach Brien, MidCityMessenger.com)

Sunday concluded the 11 annual Bayou Boogaloo festival on Bayou Saint John. The three-day festival featured music from local, national and international acts. The festival also invests in the Mid City neighborhood, including funding to plant more trees along the bayou.

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May 112016
 

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Less than 100 Historic Wooden Carousels remain in the United States, and New Orleans City Park has one! On November 19th, 1905, the City Park Improvement Association board reported that the “Flying Horses” privilege was awarded to Mr. Bartholomew A. Murphy for five years beginning January 1, 1906, and this privilege with Mr. Murphy extended through 1928. Due to his great track record with operating the first Wooden Carousel in New Orleans at Audubon Park, Mr. Murphy won the bid over three other submissions. Continue reading »

Apr 062016
 

Presented by Friends of City Park

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We all know New Orleans City Park—the 1,300 acre, majestic urban park at the heart of New Orleans. The Park is home to the largest collection of Live Oaks in the world and is larger than New York’s Central Park. But do you know Friends of City Park? Friends is a non-profit 501(c)(3) that is dedicated to raising funds for capital improvement projects in City Park.

Friends of City Park was established in 1979, due to the lack of local and state funding received at the time for the park. This support organization was created to initiate programs and stage events to increase public awareness and support. The first project to be funded was the restoration of the formal Rose Garden and the erection of a fence around what is known today as the New Orleans City Park Botanical Garden. Friends of City Park is vital to the park’s growth and has given millions of dollars to City Park for various different projects. Continue reading »

Jan 032016
 
Runners make their way up Orleans Avenue during the 109th Annual Jackson Day Race. The race, which is New Orleans' oldest, stretches nine miles from Old Spanish Fort, through Mid City, finishing at Jackson Square. (Zach Brien, MidCityMessenger.com)

Runners make their way up Orleans Avenue during the 109th Annual Jackson Day Race. The race, which is New Orleans’ oldest, stretches 5.6 miles from Old Spanish Fort, through Mid City, finishing at Jackson Square. (Zach Brien, MidCityMessenger.com)

On Sunday morning, 587 runners and walkers braved the 50-degree weather to partake in the 109th annual Jackson Day Race. The race, which begins at Old Spanish Fort near Lake Pontchartrain and weaves 5.6 miles through Mid City finishing in the French Quarter at Jackson Square.

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