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Jul 212017
 

Miles Tully, Jr. of Melt in Mid-City accepts his award for Best Millennial in Culinary Arts. The 2017 Millennial Awards “honors dynamic young professionals” in various categories, including digital media, real estate, tourism and healthcare. (Zach Brien, UptownMessenger.com)

In celebrating how a young generation influences the city, The Spears Group and Greater New Orleans, Inc. presented the 5th annual Millennial Awards.

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Jul 212017
 

The General Laundry Cleaners and Dyers Building. Photo courtesy of PCNO.

By Claire Byun
cbyun@nolamessenger.com

The General Laundry, Cleaners, and Dyers Building has earned a nomination for a historic landmark in New Orleans. But the fight isn’t over yet.

The Historic District Landmarks Commission, which oversees demolition in Mid-City and also works to protect historically-significant structures, nominated the Art Deco building as a historic landmark at its meeting Thursday. The group will meet again to approve or deny the 1930’s-era structure, though commission staff readily stressed the building’s architectural significance in a city with little Art Deco influence.

“This building is wholly singular in New Orleans as an extremely exciting example of the heights that industrial architecture can achieve,” the staff report said. Continue reading »

Jul 202017
 

Demolition of a double shotgun on 2616 St. Philip St. must first be approved by the HDLC (Via HDLC).

A dilapidated house nestled on St. Philip Street is up for demolition, though the Historic District Landmarks Commission must give first approval.

The double shotgun located at 2616 St. Philip Street has been boarded up and vacant for years. The request for demolition – submitted by owner Rodney James – will go before the HDLC commission Thursday afternoon. The HDLC oversees demolition of properties in Mid-City, but not new construction. Continue reading »

Jul 202017
 

Photo of a vehicle similar to the one stolen from the 1600 block of Dorgenois Street (via NOPD).

New Orleans police are searching for a red car stolen from the 1600 block of North Dorgenois Street late last month.

The victim’s vehicle was last seen parked in the area on June 25 around 7 p.m. While the victim was out of town, her roommate noticed the vehicle was missing the next day at about 3:00 a.m.

When the victim returned home on July 2, she reported the vehicle stolen, police said. Continue reading »

Jul 192017
 

Patrick Armstrong

To read Patrick Armstrong’s Question for Candidates Volume 1, click here.

By the time this publishes, New Orleans may have our actual, final list of contestants for your vote in this fall’s municipal election. At long last, we citizens will know who will appear on our ballots and which elected offices they are campaigning to hold. That will be news in and of itself after the will-he-or-won’t-she lead up to qualifying. I have this feeling we’re going to end up with a much more boring set of elections than usual, and the excitement is pretty much over at this point. At least the vibrant online rumor mill didn’t cost as much as the thousands of dollars for phone polling that some folks must have spent before they decided NOT to stand for election. Continue reading »

Jul 192017
 

With her father, Tamer Acikalin, by her side, Aylin Maklansky speaks at Mid-City Yacht Club on Friday. (Robert Morris, UptownMessenger.com)

By Claire Byun
cbyun@nolamessenger.com

Six candidates have thrown their hats into the City Council District A race with just three months to campaign, and local neighborhood organizations will soon be hosting forums and possibly debates for those candidates.

The Orleans Parish Libertarian Party, for one, is planning to invite each candidate to share their platform with the politically-active group. But one candidate has given herself a head start. Continue reading »

Jul 192017
 

Vehicle reported stolen from the 2100 block of Ursulines Avenue (Via NOPD).

New Orleans Police are searching for a white SUV stolen from the 2100 block of Ursulines Avenue sometime over the last two months.

The victim’s vehicle was last seen parked in the parking lot of apartments in the area on May 3 at about 6 a.m. When the victim returned on July 5 around 3 p.m. from an extended vacation, he discovered the vehicle missing from the area, police said. Continue reading »

Jul 182017
 

Courtney Miles (via NOPD)

The New Orleans Police Department is searching for a man wanted for questioning in connection to the June 3 shooting on Tulane Avenue that left three people dead.

Courtney Miles, 34, was developed as a person of interest by NOPD detectives. Miles is not wanted in connection with this incident, but is being sought for questioning, police said. Continue reading »

Jul 182017
 

By Claire Byun
cbyun@nolamessenger.com

Nearly a year after the Orleans Parish Libertarian Party first launched opposition to the city’s plan to double traffic cameras, the group is still finding avenues to remove them.

One of those avenues, by way of petition, is gaining steam.

The Orleans Parish chapter is active in lobbying against new laws it opposes, and party members have long described their belief that traffic cameras and other forms of government surveillance represent an unnecessary intrusion into citizens’ private lives. Party members also see the cameras as simply a revenue booster for the city, rather than a safety improvement as was posed by city administration. Continue reading »

Jul 182017
 

We lock up far too many of our citizens.

Of course, I’m writing from New Orleans, Louisiana, which some call the “incarceration capital of the world.” Even ardent law-and-order types have come to realize the problems with this approach. Efforts are underway to reduce incarceration rates in both our city and state. Meanwhile, Oklahoma is playing catch-up, so perhaps we won’t hold this title for much longer.

Even so, it’s shameful.

Yet this is not just a local problem. Across the nation, we lock up too many folks. According to The Sentencing Project, our country is the world leader in incarceration. We have 2.2 million people in our jails and prisons, a 500% increase over the last four decades.

1920 to 2014. Timeline of total number of inmates in U.S. prisons, jails, and juvenile facilities. (Public domain image from Wikimedia Commons.)

 

Most of this comes down to policy changes, such as tougher sentencing laws — not rising crime rates. Nevertheless, our prisons function as “seminaries of vice,” where casual offenders become hardened criminals.

Plus, it’s expensive. The whole system stinks.

But we can fix this. If we change our laws, we can reduce crime through the expedient of legalization. Take something that’s illegal and make it legal. Voila! You just reduced crime.

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